HiPP Organic

HiPP's Baby & Nutrition Blog

Breastfeeding when returning to work

Posted on 26 November 2010 by Helen

Hi everyone,

Someone asked me on Twitter if you can continue to breastfeed when returning to work and the answer is definitely yes.

Obviously it will depend on how many hours that you work and the times of the day that you will not be around to feed your baby that will determine how you will work around this. It will also depend on the age of your baby as to how workable this will be, with babies over 6 months being easier to leave with bottles generally as they are getting used to foods other than milk at this time too.

If possible you may well choose to breastfeed your baby before you go to work and then leave either expressed breastmilk or formula to be given to your baby at other feeds until you return from work. You will then be able to continue to breastfeed for the rest of the day.

It is important to remember that the volume of breastmilk your body produces is determined by the level of demand, so if you're giving your baby less of your milk the amount you produce will also reduce. Expressing milk will help to maintain this supply but if you are giving formula feeds then this supply will diminish. However, combination feeding can be very successful as long as the demand for breastfeeds continues.

Hope this helps, let me know if you have any more questions.

Have a nice weekend,

Helen

 

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Hints and tips on changing from breast to bottle feeding your baby

Posted on 23 November 2010 by Helen

Hi again.

Breastfeeding is best, few people will dispute this fact. But, it isn’t always possible or desirable. Some can’t or choose not to breastfeed their baby from the start, whereas others start breastfeeding but then for one reason or another need to switch over to the bottle, either totally or partially. Whatever choice you make, it makes sense to discuss your feeding options with a health visitor or breastfeeding counsellor who is trained to give support and handy advice.

So, if you find yourself in the position of needing to switch over from breastfeeding to bottle feeding, perhaps because you’re returning to work, do I have any hints or tips to help make the changeover easier?

1. Start to introduce a bottle a few weeks ahead – just in case it takes a while for your baby to get used to it
2. Decide whether you are going to give your baby expressed breastmilk or formula, and if you go for the latter, decide which formula you want to use.  Sometimes babies take to the bottle better if it contains the familiar taste of your breastmilk at first, before moving onto a formula a bit later
3. Make sure the milk you’re offering is warm
4. Choose the perfect time to try the bottle, when baby is alert and slightly hungry (don’t wait until your baby is really hungry as they won’t be in the mood for trying something new if they are), and you are relaxed and not in a rush
5. Hold your baby so they are turned away from you so they are not trying to find your nipple
6. Stay calm and reassuring; try not to show any frustration you might feel if it doesn’t work out straightaway
7. Perhaps ask your partner or someone else close to the baby to give the bottle rather than you if they seem reluctant to take the bottle from you

For more information and tips, visit the HiPP Baby Club.

Have you tried to switch over from breast to bottle? What were your experiences? I’d love to hear from you.

Best wishes,
Helen

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How much does my baby need to drink?

Posted on 10 November 2010 by Helen

Hi Everyone,

If I’m asked the question ‘How much drink should my baby have?’, I look at their age, weight, milk intake, stage of weaning, health, environmental conditions, and so on, and then consider how much they should have to meet their needs and to avoid dehydration.

Generally, babies less than 4-6 months should not be offered any additional drinks (water, diluted juice or others) other than their usual milk. Milk alone, either breast milk or formula, should be able to meet all their needs for nutrition and fluids up to at least 4 months of age, and giving additional drinks can be harmful if they reduce milk intake. However, an occasional additional drink may help if the baby has a fever, in hot weather or in centrally-heated houses where there is the possibility of dehydration, and a small volume of cooled, boiled water once or twice a day should do the trick in these situations.

For babies who have already started weaning onto solids, a small drink of water or diluted fruit juice can be given at mealtimes to ensure baby doesn’t get thirsty. Between meals, only water or milk should be offered because of the risk of dental decay caused by drinks containing sugars (whether naturally occurring or added). Milk continues to be really important throughout the weaning period though and milk feeds should be given 3-4 times a day, with at least a pint of milk (about 600ml) being consumed.

Toddlers need less milk (about 360-500ml each day), but they still need fluids to avoid becoming dehydrated.

You should always keep an eye on how well hydrated your baby is. Regular wet nappies are important and signs of dehydrated should be acted on swiftly:

  • Dark yellow urine
  • A sunken fontanelle (soft spot) 
  • Dry or sticky lips and mouth 
  • Skin that has lost its elasticity

Hope this helps. Let us know if you’re not sure if your baby is getting enough.

Bye for now.
Helen

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When is it safe to introduce gluten into my baby’s diet?

Posted on 2 November 2010 by Helen

Hi!

I hope you are all having a good week.

For those of you that have already started weaning, and also for those of you that aren't at that stage yet but still interested in what it's all about, a topic that often comes up is 'when is it safe to introduce gluten into my baby's diet?'

So what is gluten and why do people worry about it? Gluten is a protein found in some cereals, namely wheat, rye and barley, and it can cause an autoimmune disease called 'Coeliac disease'. This disease affects about 1 in 100 of the population and tends to run in families, where there's a 1 in 10 chance that a new baby will develop the condition if a close relative already has coeliac disease. 

However, how you wean your baby isn't influenced by whether there's a family history of coeliac disease or not. If you start weaning between 4- 6 months, the current recommendation is that you should avoid giving gluten-containing foods until your baby has reached 6 months. Manufactured baby foods will tell you on the label if the product is gluten free. From 6 months, all babies should be introduced to some gluten-containing foods, including wheat based foods like pasta, bread, cereals.  There are no benefits in delaying the introduction of gluten beyond 6 months for any babies.

At the risk of confusing you, it has been suggested recently however that introducing gluten between the age of 4-7 months while breastfeeding may actually reduce the risk of coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes and wheat allergy, so the recommendations on gluten might change in the future, but don't worry about that for now!

If you want to know more about coeliac disease, visit the Coeliac UK website.

Goodbye till next week.

Helen

 

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Breastfeeding and nutrition - what's best to eat?

Posted on 25 August 2010 by Helen

 alt= Hi all!

In our recent survey, we asked HiPP Babyclub new mums what foods were their favourite snacks to give them energy; nearly a quarter of them said ‘CHOCOLATE’!! 

A good, varied and balanced diet will help to make sure you have the energy and nutrients needed to fuel the hard work being a new mum entails! Other foods that rated in the Top Ten were bananas, other fruits, cereal and cereal bars and nuts, so all this looks much better from a nutritionist’s point of view and goes to show that healthier foods can be popular too!

In the past I’ve been asked if there are any foods that can cause upsets for breastfed babies and should not be eaten. There are no definite foods/drinks that breastfeeding mums should avoid (apart from those mentioned below) as every mum and baby is different and will react differently to different foods, but if you suspect that a particular food you are eating is upsetting your baby, it’s a good idea if you talk to your health visitor or doctor about this before cutting this food out of your diet.  You don’t want to restrict your diet unnecessarily and you don’t want to compromise your intake of any nutrients by doing so.

Of course, there are certain foods that you are advised to avoid if you are breastfeeding your baby.  Small amounts of whatever you eat or drink can pass into your breastmilk and then onto your baby.  It’s a good idea to avoid too much caffeine, in drinks and chocolate, as it can stimulate your baby and keep them awake. An alcoholic drink now and again whilst you’re breastfeeding is not likely to do them or you any harm, but as small amounts of alcohol are transferred to the baby through breastmilk it is best not to drink more than 1-2 units of alcohol once or twice a week.  And if you can delay breastfeeding until an hour or more after you’ve had a drink, this is better for them too as the amount of alcohol in your breastmilk gradually declines with time.  

Best wishes! - Helen

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