HiPP Organic

HiPP's Baby & Nutrition Blog

Five things you probably didn’t know about HiPP

Posted on 18 July 2016 by Lindsay


Here at HiPP, we create some pretty amazing organic products for babies. But did you know how much more we do? Here are five things you probably didn’t know:

1.  We have a pet falcon. Well, not so much a pet, really – the beautiful peregrine falcon who resides at our German head office & factory is more of an employee, in charge of pigeon control. We think he does a wonderful job! 

2. We’re landlords to lots of wildlife. We go to great lengths to create welcoming homes for a huge variety of creatures, from bird and bat nesting boxes to insect hotels to lizard houses. Many of these tiny tenants return the favour by ridding our crops of lots of insect pests – and they help keep the local ecosystem nicely balanced, too.

Strategies that work particularly well on our model farm get shared with our 8,000 partner farms, so they can take advantage of our research to improve their methods.


3. We plant non-food crops, too. Of course, it takes lots of land to grow enough fruit and veg to make all our delicius HiPP foods – but we make sure to set aside areas on each farm for growing other types of plants as well. Native wildflowers and grasses provide the perfect habitat for local wildlife, and our farmers often sow “green manure” crops which are then plowed back into the soil to increase its fertility. We even select an annual “Tree of the Year” to plant in our growing woodland at HiPP HQ, and a German campaign we led several years ago led to the planting of around 5,000 more trees in deforested areas.


4. We have our own Alpine spring. After going to such great lengths to avoid chemical pesticides and pollutants in our farming, we wanted to make sure the water we use to cook those delicious fruits and veggies was just as clean – so we dug a well. And this is not your average well –  the Georg HippSpring draws pure, natural Alpine water from more than 150 metres below our production facility in Germany. The water from our well is incredibly clean – which makes it perfect to use in cooking our baby food. 

5. We teach fish to climb. This isn’t as crazy as it sounds! A lot of the electricity we use comes from renewable sources, one of which is hydropower. Because hydropower plants work by changing the flow of rivers, migrating fish may find it difficult or impossible to pass. The solution is to install “fish ladders” - a series of linked pools that the fish can use to climb past the power plant.

Did any of these surprise you? Let us know in the comments section below! Or visit www.hipp.co.uk to learn more.




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Holiday tastes for the littlest ones

Posted on 19 December 2014 by Lindsay

Christmas is a time of joy, of course, but if you're in the middle of weaning your baby right now, you might be forgiven for also feeling a tiny bit unlucky – after all, it's not the easiest thing to be pureeing organic pumpkin whilst simultaneously preparing turkey and trimmings for twelve.

But fear not, wise parent:  Christmas is actually the perfect time to add some amazing flavours to your baby's repertoire. (And if you're way too busy for the food processor right now, that's okay – we're here to help!)

Taste matters – now and for the future!

Flavour is definitely important – in fact, it's one of the key parts of weaning, and it's something to keep in mind from the very beginning.

Here's why. Your baby is born with a taste for sweet, high-fat foods – not coincidentally, like breast milk – because they provide lots of energy for that growing little body. Young babies also tend to be wary of bitter tastes initially, which is probably a protective instinct to keep them from putting mouldy or poisonous things in their mouths. (Clever little sprouts!)

When weaning time comes around, though, it’s a golden opportunity to expand your baby’s taste horizons. At around 6 months, babies tend to be more open to new tastes and textures than they may be later on – and several studies have found that introducing stronger flavours early on has a direct effect on babies’ food preferences later in life, as well as their tendency toward fussy eating habits.

In short, if you want a toddler who noshes happily on broccoli or loves a mild curry, it’s best to introduce them to plenty of exciting flavours from the start. Of course, these new tastes are a bit of a shock at first – keep the camera handy, as the faces they make are often priceless! But if your baby refuses a new food that’s nutritious, keep trying.  Babies are more likely to accept a new taste the more they are exposed to it – and a bit of enthusiasm and praise from Mum and Dad will often help the spinach (or swede, or parsnip) go down.

Don't skip the lumps

Texture is important, too: one study of nearly 8,000 children showed that if babies were introduced to lumpy foods before nine months of age, they ate significantly more food groups at age 7 (including a whopping 10 kinds of fruits and veggies). And those lumps and bumps also help your baby develop the mouth and tongue muscles that will soon come in handy for talking!

Of course, nothing you do can guarantee your baby will skip the dreaded picky-eating stage, and most toddlers do end up with a few ‘difficult’ foods during this time. But offering plenty of variety early on is your best bet – and it will help set your baby up for a lifetime of healthy, happy eating to come.

Holiday tastes for your baby to try – and a few to avoid

At this time of year, most of us have foods in the house that don't get a look in the rest of the year – and that's a shame! Many of them are perfect for your baby to taste as well. Here are a few:

Brussels sprouts: If you're roasting or steaming some sprouts for the adults, try pureeing or fork-mashing a few for your baby, too. Brussels sprouts and other brassica vegetables are ultra-healthy, so giving your little one a taste for them now is a move that will definitely pay off down the road!

Turkey: Mild and full of protein, turkey makes great baby food. Older babies can hold and gnaw on larger bits, and even the littlest ones can taste some breast meat, maybe pureed with a bit of breast or formula milk (and some roast pumpkin, if you have any!)

Cranberry relish: A tiny bit of this zingy condiment will be sure to get your baby's taste-buds tingling! Offer a bit on a clean spoon or finger and watch the reaction...

Mash: Set a bit aside before adding any salt, and let it cool – your baby will probably be quite happy to dig in even without a spoon (if you can handle the mess factor!)

Cheese: A holiday cheeseboard is a great chance to let your baby try bits of stronger flavours like hard or pasteurised goat's cheese and aged Cheddar – just cut off tiny slivers and let the fun begin!

However, not everything on your festive table is baby-friendly: you'll want to avoid anything that's got alcohol in it, obviously (so no plum pudding or egg nog!), and steer clear of choking hazards like whole nuts, grapes and chipolatas until your baby is older and very comfortable with finger foods.

And of course, if you have a dozen for dinner and it all gets a bit too hectic to puree, we've got your back: My First Sunday Dinner is a moreish blend of healthy veg and roast turkey, perfect for an easy and nutritious holiday meal!

What's on your baby's festive menu this year?



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Setting a good example around foods

Posted on 2 May 2012 by Helen

Hi everyone,

As parents we have many responsibilities. One that shouldn’t be underestimated in this day and age, in my opinion, is teaching our children about healthy food choices and sensible eating.  

We must try to help our children feel good about their bodies and show them how to maintain a healthy body weight, whilst ensuring that the foods they choose provides all the nutrition they need for good health and well-being. Whilst you may feel you don’t have all the skills and nutritional knowledge to pass on to your children, there are various tools available to help you do this. Some links that you might find useful for yourself and any older children are given below:

NHS - Good food for home

NHS - Change 4 Life

Some simple things to remember include:

  • Offer children a variety of nutritious foods at planned meal and snack times – and if possible eat with them and use it as an opportunity to talk about different foods and why they are good to include in the diet
  • Plan meals and snacks at regular times - Having set meals and snack times can help children develop good eating patterns and teach them good food behaviors
  • Don’t overfeed – try and pick up on their cues for when they are hungry or full. Babies and young children generally have ways of telling you when they are hungry and know when they’ve had enough to eat. Don’t force babies and young children to finish off all the food that you offer them if they don’t seem to want it.
  • Try and be a positive role model for a healthy lifestyle - Children like to imitate adults, and will learn many of their attitudes about healthy (or unhealthy) eating and physical activity from you. Be enthusiastic about trying new foods yourself. Spend time playing actively with them and don’t just sit and watch. When children notice that you are trying new foods and playing actively, they are more likely to do the same.

For a handy guide on what makes up a good diet for a baby, why not have a look at our leaflet.

I hope you’ve found this interesting.

Best wishes,



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