HiPP Organic

HiPP's Baby & Nutrition Blog

It's Christmas time!

Posted on 21 December 2010 by Helen

Hi Everyone,

What an exciting time of year this is. I have to confess I’m a little bit sad that my 3 kids are getting older and some of the magic surrounding Christmas has diminished. But for those of you celebrating your baby’s first Christmas, what a fun time you have ahead!

For some babies, it might only be the Christmas tree lights and the wrapping paper that capture their imagination, but for others that are already enjoying a mixed diet now can be the time to introduce them to the new taste of Christmas-time favourites, such as cranberries, Brussels sprouts (you either love ‘em or hate ‘em!), bread sauce, and of course turkey.

To make life a bit easier, your baby can have lots of the same food that the rest of the family will be eating for Christmas lunch, so take some cooked veg, e.g. potatoes, parsnips, carrots, Brussels, peas, with some turkey breast, and then puree, mash or chop these to the correct consistency for your baby, adding some of baby’s usual milk if necessary. It is best to avoid gravies as these tend to be a bit too high in salt for young babies, and likewise it might be best to cook your dinner without salt and then add this if necessary once you’ve takenyour baby’s portion away. You might also find it easier if you (or a willing relative) feed your baby before everyone else sits down for their Christmas meal, so that they aren’t hungry and hopefully you can have a more relaxing mealtime.

Another thing to bear in mind on Christmas day is that although you might well find that one massive meal in the middle of the day is enough for you, your baby will still need feeding at normal mealtimes and it’s at times like this that HiPP Organic baby foods can be really convenient. Have a look at the HiPP Organic range. 

Have a great time over the festive season and wishing you all the best for 2011.

Best wishes,
Helen

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Introducing your baby onto lumpier foods

Posted on 8 December 2010 by Helen

Hi!

Weaning advice generally recommends that babies should be introduced to lumpier foods between 6-9 months of age. However, research studies have shown that a significant number of babies (13-18%) are not introduced to lumps in this period, and babies not given lumps until after 9 months of age are more likely to be difficult, picky eaters. These problems are still evident at 15 months and even at 7 years of age. It appears that there is a critical period in the second half of infancy during which babies more readily accept new tastes and textures and consequently it is important that babies are encouraged to eat more challenging textures during this period.

Learning to chew is also important in the correct muscle development and use of the tongue needed for speech. Some babies find the move from smooth weaning foods with no lumps to the lumpier foods quite difficult, but it is worth persevering.

If you're preparing your own baby foods then you should adjust the consistency according to what your baby can cope with, aiming for more and more lumps and a coarser texture as you go. Start by introducing soft lumps at first by mashing soft fruits, cooked vegetables or cooked pasta, perhaps with some mashed fish or pureed meat. If on the other hand you are using commercial baby foods like HiPP Organic, switch from Stage 1 to Stage 2 foods that are specially designed for this next stage of feeding. Don’t be surprised if your baby spits out lumps to begin with, or if lumps get coughed back for more chewing – this is normal. 

If your baby is finding the change from smooth baby foods to lumpier Stage 2 baby foods difficult, why not try mixing smooth Stage 1 baby food with some lumpier Stage 2 food in the same bowl (choosing similar or complementary flavours), gradually increasing the amount of the lumpier food as baby gets used to chewing. Alternatively, you may want to try mashing the Stage 2 food with a fork slightly before you feed it to your baby, and then gradually mash it less and less.

Until next time.....
Helen

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When to introduce finger foods

Posted on 30 November 2010 by Helen

Hi again!

I’m often asked when it is safe for babies to have ‘finger foods’. As soon as a baby is able to handle these foods properly and shows an interest in doing so is probably the best answer, and for most babies the fine finger control needed develops at around 7 months of age. Introducing some independent feeding using foods that baby can safely eat and which involve some chewing is fun and will help with speech development and the overall progress of babies towards family-type meals. Don’t worry if your baby hasn’t got any teeth yet, their gums are hard enough for them to manage many finger foods quite easily now.

You can choose a variety of nutritious finger foods of different shapes and colours for your baby to enjoy, offering some at each mealtime alongside their normal meal.  Start off with softer foods such as pieces of ripe fruit e.g. banana, melon, mango, pear, or lightly cooked vegetables e.g. carrot sticks, broccoli florets, baby sweetcorn, and gradually as they become more competent you can try other foods like those listed below:-

  • fingers of pitta bread, toast or bread, rice cakes
  • cooked pasta shapes
  • cooked pieces of chicken or turkey, or fish
  • quarters of hard-boiled egg, or scrambled egg
  • grated cheese or cubes of cheese
  • dried fruits e.g. apricots, raisins, sultanas
  • raw vegetables e.g. tomatoes, cucumber, peppers
  • roasted vegetable pieces, e.g. parsnip, carrot, sweet potato

For a selection of dip recipes to try with some finger foods, have a look at the weaning recipes on the HiPP Baby Club.  

HiPP Organic offers a variety of finger foods for different stages, including Little Nibbles Rice Cakes for your baby to enjoy.

But remember, always stay with your baby and make sure they are sitting up straight while they’re eating, and avoid giving hard foods such as raw carrot, apple or whole grapes until you are confident that they can handle them without the risk of choking.

Hope it goes well.

Best wishes.
Helen

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Should babies be weaned onto a vegan diet?

Posted on 17 November 2010 by Helen

Hello everyone,

Further to my post about vegetarian diets on 27th October, a couple of mums have asked me for more information on vegan diets for babies. As I said before, I believe vegetarian diets are suitable for children, provided parents take care to ensure the diet is varied and contains adequate energy, sources of iron and vitamin C at mealtimes to aid iron absorption.

Meeting all baby’s nutritional needs with a vegan diet excluding all animal products is not so easy, however, and should only be embarked upon after very careful consideration and consultation with a dietitian/doctor. It is too easy for the vegan diet to be deficient in energy or essential nutrients unless the parent really understands the importance of nutrition and makes appropriate food choices.

As a vegan diet is usually bulky and high in fibre, babies get full up before they have taken enough energy so it is really important that high calorie foods such as tofu, avocados, bananas and smooth nut and seed butters (e.g.tahini, cashew or peanut butter) are given. Extra energy can be added to foods by using vegetable oils or vegan fat spreads. For protein, beans and pulses, cereals, tofu and soya yogurts are useful, and of course breast milk or a soya-based formula milk formula will help ensure baby gets enough protein.  This milk will also help to provide much-needed calcium.  Iron deficiency can be avoided by including dark green leafy vegetables, beans and pulses, and dried fruits (particularly apricots). Omega 3 fatty acids are found in some vegetable oils (linseed, flaxseed, walnut and rapeseed) and it is good to use these oils in place of other oils (sunflower, safflower or corn) to help meet omega 3 requirements.

Parents must also pay particular attention to baby’s vitamin requirements.  A vitamin supplement containing vitamins A, C and D is recommended for all babies from 6 months up to 5 years.  Since the only reliable sources of vitamin B12 in the diet are meat, eggs and dairy products, vegans must get their B12 from fortified foods such as yeast extracts, fortified breakfast cereals or soya formulas, and a B12 supplement may also be needed.  

What do you think- should babies ever be weaned onto a vegan diet?  Should parents impose their dietary beliefs on their children?

Let me know.
Helen  

 

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When is it safe to introduce gluten into my baby’s diet?

Posted on 2 November 2010 by Helen

Hi!

I hope you are all having a good week.

For those of you that have already started weaning, and also for those of you that aren't at that stage yet but still interested in what it's all about, a topic that often comes up is 'when is it safe to introduce gluten into my baby's diet?'

So what is gluten and why do people worry about it? Gluten is a protein found in some cereals, namely wheat, rye and barley, and it can cause an autoimmune disease called 'Coeliac disease'. This disease affects about 1 in 100 of the population and tends to run in families, where there's a 1 in 10 chance that a new baby will develop the condition if a close relative already has coeliac disease. 

However, how you wean your baby isn't influenced by whether there's a family history of coeliac disease or not. If you start weaning between 4- 6 months, the current recommendation is that you should avoid giving gluten-containing foods until your baby has reached 6 months. Manufactured baby foods will tell you on the label if the product is gluten free. From 6 months, all babies should be introduced to some gluten-containing foods, including wheat based foods like pasta, bread, cereals.  There are no benefits in delaying the introduction of gluten beyond 6 months for any babies.

At the risk of confusing you, it has been suggested recently however that introducing gluten between the age of 4-7 months while breastfeeding may actually reduce the risk of coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes and wheat allergy, so the recommendations on gluten might change in the future, but don't worry about that for now!

If you want to know more about coeliac disease, visit the Coeliac UK website.

Goodbye till next week.

Helen

 

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