HiPP Organic

HiPP's Baby & Nutrition Blog

Not eating for two, staying healthy for two!

Posted on 8 February 2012 by Helen

Hello again,

Looking after yourself during your pregnancy is important for you and will also give your baby the best start in life. I believe, and I hope you will all agree, that making sure your diet is as good as it can be makes good sense at this special time, to optimise your own health and also that of your growing baby. 

During pregnancy, you should eat as wide a variety of different foods as possible to make sure you get all the nourishment you both need. Where there might be concerns that dietary intake might not be enough to meet requirements then supplements are recommended. This is considered to be the case with folic acid which is so important in the early stages of pregnancy, and vitamin D supplements are recommended nowadays too. Speak to your doctor if you want more information on vitamin supplements, or if it’s easier then the NHS website is really helpful. 

For advice on healthy eating during pregnancy, rather than me listing it all out here, can I ask you to visit the HiPP website.

Here you will find lots of valuable information about your pregnancy diet, foods to avoid, recipes to try and what to do if you have concerns about food allergies. And if you have any questions that you can’t find answers for, you can always ask either me or one of my colleagues and we will be more than happy to help if we can.

Good luck with your pregnancy.

Until next time...
Helen

 

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Preparing for pregnancy with a healthy diet

Posted on 31 January 2012 by Helen

Hello again!

Whether you’re planning your first baby or you’re thinking about having another, a healthy diet makes good sense for both you and your partner. Your eating, weight and lifestyle habits have a significant influence on your health, your fertility and once you’ve become pregnant on the growth and development of your unborn baby.

Now is a great time to reassess your diet and to check that you are eating a wide variety of healthy foods. You need to have a good balance between starchy carbohydrate foods; moderate amounts of protein foods; low fat dairy products and plenty of fruits and vegetables. A healthy balanced diet should supply you with all the nutrients you need, but one vitamin that is particularly important pre-conceptually and in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy is folic acid and so you should take extra folic acid (400mcg/day) in the form of a supplement during this time.

There are also a couple of other nutrients that need special attention at this time. You should make sure you’re eating enough iron-rich foods to build up your body stores in preparation for your pregnancy, so include red meat, fish, poultry, beans, dark green leafy vegetables and wholegrain cereals regularly. Omega 3 fatty acids play a critical role in the development of the brain and nervous system of a baby so it is a good idea to top up your stores of these too by eating two portions of fish per week (at least one of these portions as oily fish such as salmon, trout, mackerel).

Both you and your partner should reduce your alcohol intakes in line with official recommendations and aim for a healthy weight. Being a healthy body weight can help you to conceive – being very underweight or obese can reduce your chances of conceiving, and being obese while pregnant can increase the risk of complications. And for your partner, it is worth checking the diet contains enough zinc and selenium containing foods as these have been shown to be linked with sperm quality. Lean red meat, wholegrain cereals, seafood and eggs are good sources of these nutrients.

If you want to read more, here are two good links which you may find useful:

http://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/lifestages/trying-for-a-baby
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/treatments/healthy_living/nutrition/life_preconcpreg.shtml

Until next time....
Helen

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Baby’s first Christmas

Posted on 16 December 2011 by Helen

 

Hi again,

Your baby’s first Christmas is a magical time for them and for you. It’s a time when you can re-live some of the wonderful traditions that you grew up with at this time of year and maybe even introduce some new ones. Of course your little one will probably be too young to appreciate it all, but will undoubtedly enjoy the lights and sparkling decorations, the extra attention of family and friends, and of course the presents (or more specifically what they’re  wrapped up in!).

With everything that’s going on it might be quite hard but do try and keep your baby’s routine as close to normal at this time. Babies prefer it this way and they (and you) will stay calmer and happier as a result. There’s no need to splash out on extravagant presents when they’re tiny (and as a mother of 3 teenagers I can assure you their requests will get more costly as they get older so hold onto your money while you can!). And remember to take lots of photos of these special times.

Continue with your normal mealtime routine, but why not offer them a Christmas Day menu?  For breakfast, try HiPP Apple & Cranberry Breakfast (either on its own or added to baby’s normal cereal); a Christmas lunch from HiPP's selection of festive recipes, followed by a fruity HiPP dessert; and of course whatever your baby fancies in the evening.

We all hope that you and your baby have a fabulous Christmas!

Helen and the HiPP team.

 

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Christmas time and pregnancy

Posted on 2 December 2011 by Helen

Hi everyone,

Being careful about what you eat and drink is all part of being pregnant, but with so many tempting foods and drinks on offer what should you particularly look out for to ensure you, and your bump, remain safe?

Cold meats and fish – Parma ham and salami, although cured, are not cooked and may cause toxoplasmosis (an infection usually harmless to adults but can cause serious problems for an unborn baby) so say ‘no’ to these.  Smoked salmon and sushi are fine (provided frozen fish has been used to make the sushi), but avoid shellfish (unless cooked till piping hot).

Cheeses – have a look at our website and handy guide for advice on what cheeses you can eat and those to avoid on the cheese board.

Salads – steer clear of any salads made with homemade mayonnaise but shop bought mayonnaise from a jar is fine. Make sure salad leaves are always thoroughly washed first.

Turkey – this is perfectly safe, provided you make sure it is cooked thoroughly. Take extra care when handling the raw turkey, washing all surfaces and your hands afterwards. Follow all cooking instructions carefully (length of time you need to cook the bird and oven temperature to use). Of course, if your turkey is frozen make sure it is completely defrosted before roasting.

Desserts – always check whether any raw or partly cooked eggs have been used in recipes. For this reason, avoid homemade meringues and chocolate mousses for example as they can contain salmonella. 

Most other foods are completely safe, but if in doubt ask and keep our handy ‘foods to avoid’ card with you to check.

Of course Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without a special drink. Of course you should avoid alcohol, but this doesn’t mean you can’t have a special festive drink.  Why not try our delicious 'mock-tails'?

Have a good one!
Helen

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Caesarean delivery

Posted on 25 November 2011 by Amber

Hi everyone,

It was reported in the news this week that pregnant women who ask for a caesarean delivery should be allowed to have one. You can read the full story on the BBC website.

A vaginal birth is generally safer than a caesarean birth. However, a caesarean section may be needed to save the life of a mum or baby. In these cases, caesarean birth is without question the safest option.

But there are also times when the decision is not so obvious and it will be up to you and your doctor to weigh up the risks and benefits of having a caesarean to decide what's best for you. Although a caesarean is a common procedure, it involves major surgery in your abdominal and pelvic area, and all operations carry risks. 
 
Disadvantages of a caesarean:

  1. Pain. The main disadvantage is pain after the caesarean. This may last for a few weeks or more after the operation. You will be given medication to help cope with the pain but it will affect your daily activities.
  2. Infection. Before the operation, you will be offered a single dose of antibiotics, but about 8% of women still go on to get an infection.
  3. Blood clot. Any surgery carries a risk of developing a blood clot. This can be serious, or even life-threatening, depending on where the clot develops. You will be given blood-thinning drugs and support stockings to improve the blood flow in your legs after the caesarean. You'll also be encouraged to get up and move around as soon as possible afterwards. This helps your circulation and reduce your risk of developing a clot.
  4. Adhesions. These are bands of scar tissue which form as you heal and can make organs in your abdomen stick to each other or to the inside of your abdominal wall. About half of women who have had a caesarean get adhesions, and this can increase with more caesareans. Adhesions can be painful because they limit the movement of your internal organs.
  5. Infertility. Occasionally, adhesions can lead to problems with fertility, as they can press on or block fallopian tubes. Sometimes women experience unexplained infertility after a caesarean.
  6. Anaesthetic. Most caesareans are done with an epidural or spinal, which numbs you from the abdominal area down. An epidural or spinal is safer for you and your baby than a general anaesthetic. However, having any anaesthetic involves a small risk. With epidurals and spinals a few women can have; a severe headache (affects about 1% of women); nerve damage. This rarely happens and, if it does, it usually only lasts for a few days or weeks although very rarely it’s permanent.
  7. Injury to the bladder, to the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) or to the bowel.
  8. Very occasionally, if there are major complications, to protect a woman's health, doctors may have to perform an operation to remove the uterus (hysterectomy).
  9. A blood transfusion. If you've had a serious complication during the caesarean, you may need a blood transfusion. Some of the rarer complications of a caesarean can be life-threatening. However, the risk of a caesarean proving fatal is extremely small, only one in 12,000.
  10. Breathing difficulties for the baby. About 35 in every 1,000 babies have breathing problems after a caesarean compared with five in 1,000 babies born vaginally. Breathing problems are more common for premature babies born by caesarean or babies born by a caesarean before labour started.
  11. About 2% of babies get a nick or cut from the doctor's scalpel.
  12. Although early postnatal depression is more common in women who've had a caesarean than women who've had a vaginal birth, by two months, the rates are about the same.
  13. Women who've had a caesarean are less likely to start breastfeeding than women who've had a vaginal birth. However, once you've started, your chances of success are the same as for a woman who's given birth vaginally.
  14. It can affect future pregnancies. Once you've had one caesarean, you're much more likely to have another caesarean in future pregnancies. Having had a caesarean slightly increases your risk of having a low-lying-placenta (placenta praevia) in future pregnancies. There is a very small risk of the scar on your uterus opening up again in future pregnancies or births. This is called a uterine rupture but is rare and affects 0.5-1% of women in future pregnancies.

 

Advantage of a caesarean:

  1. If it’s planned, you will know when your baby will be born.
  2. Although you'll have a very sore tummy, you won't have some of the discomforts that can result from a vaginal birth, such as pain and bruising and tears and stitches around your vagina.
  3. Caesarean birth may help protect against the slight risk of urine leaks and in later years, vaginal prolapse. However, other factors such as the number of births, having big babies, having assisted deliveries and obesity also contribute to these conditions. Pregnancy itself is also a risk factor for these conditions as it can weaken your pelvic floor, so you still need to do your pelvic floor exercises!

If you have any questions about either a caesarean or a vaginal birth, don't be afraid to ask your midwife and talk through all of the options with her.

Best wishes - Amber

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