HiPP Organic

HiPP's Baby & Nutrition Blog

The importance of a healthy lifestyle for our children

Posted on 29 July 2011 by Helen

Hi Everyone,

The last few weeks have seen a huge amount of media coverage on the impact of diet and activity levels on the long-term health of our children. This follows the publication of two Government reports looking at these important areas.

The Department of Health commissioned SACN (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition) to review the influence of maternal, fetal and child nutrition on the development of chronic disease (e.g. obesity, heart disease, diabetes) in later life.

They have also issued guidance on the level of activity we should all, including children, should undertake.

These reports highlight how important it is for us parents to encourage our children to take regular and sufficient physical activity and adopt a healthy lifestyle. Of course, we’re often hearing about how a good, well-balanced diet with sufficient, but not too much, energy is vital for good health at all stages of life, but this is the first time we’re being told how much exercise our young children should actually be doing.

In the UK, pre-school children have been shown to spend on average 2-2.5 hours a day being active, but the new recommendation is that they should do at least 3 hours per day, once they can walk unaided. This could be any form of activity, ranging from riding a bike, running, climbing, jumping, skipping, walking to swimming. Even before they can walk unaided, you should encourage your baby to take part in floor-based play such as rolling, reaching for and grasping things, pulling and pushing objects, and water-based activities. The report also discourages all of us from keeping our under 5s restrained in buggies, car seats or baby bouncers, or leaving them sitting in front of TV or computer screens, for extended periods.

Are your children active enough, what is their favourite activity, do you have any issues with this new recommendation, is this advice practical for you and your family? We’d love to hear from you.

Off for a run now!
Helen

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My baby is constipated, what should I do?

Posted on 22 July 2011 by Helen

Hello again!

I’m often asked for advice about bowel habits! One of the occupational hazards of being a nutritionist/dietitian I guess. If a parent comes to me saying that their baby is not passing frequent stools and the stools are hard, often pellet-like, and baby appears to be in some pain, it’s likely they are constipated. Constipation is most common in bottle fed babies (in which case I always check that the formula is being prepared correctly), and also in babies who have started eating more solids and drinking less milk. Caused by dehydration, in these cases I often advise parents to offer extra drinks of water or diluted juice which will help to rehydrate and relieve the constipated baby.

If baby has started weaning onto solids, it’s a good idea to give a variety of different pureed or chopped fruits (adjust consistency to suit age of baby), such as apples, apricots, blueberries, grapes, pears, plums, prunes, raspberries or strawberries. These are all fibrous foods that can help relieve constipation and are worth a try. Babies can also have some wholewheat pasta or breakfast cereals, porridge or wholemeal bread to increase the amount of fibre in their diet, but the amounts of these should be kept fairly small and not given every day as they can be a bit bulky for babies.

Giving a warm bath can sometimes help relax babies and relieve constipation, as can baby massage. Also, I often suggest that parents try lying their baby on his/her back and move their legs in a bicycling motion – this can often help.

If these home treatments have not worked, or if your baby’s constipation is severe, a doctor or pharmacist may suggest a laxative, probably lactulose, but only try this with their guidance.

Some useful websites to look at for more advice are:

The nhs website
Weaning advice on hipp.co.uk

Bye for now,
Helen

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Does my baby or toddler need vitamin or mineral supplements?

Posted on 11 July 2011 by Helen

Hi!

Of course, none of us want our kids to be missing out on anything important in their diets and if there is a risk that they might not be getting enough of any particular vitamin or mineral we will probably want to give them a supplement of some sort, so when are supplements necessary?

Vitamin Supplements

In fact, the Government recommends that all children between 6 months and 5 years are given vitamin drops containing vitamins A, C and D.  Even if your child is eating a wide variety of different foods, giving this vitamin supplement can safeguard them against vitamin deficiencies and so makes good sense. 

A couple of important considerations –

  • If you are breastfeeding your baby and you didn’t take a vitamin D supplement during pregnancy, you may be advised to give your baby a vitamin D supplement from 1 month of age, not 6 months
  • If your baby is formula fed and is drinking more than 500ml formula per day, they will be getting the vitamins they need from this formula and so you won’t actually need to give them any extra vitamin supplements until they’re drinking less formula.
  • It’s important to remember that too much of some vitamins is as harmful as not enough, so don’t give your baby two vitamin supplements at the same time. 

Ask you health visitor for advice on which vitamin drops to use and if you’re eligible for free vitamin supplements for your baby. 

Mineral supplements

Unlike vitamins, most babies won’t need mineral supplements. 

One mineral parents often worry about is ‘iron’, but if your baby is eating some meat or fish every day, and eating other foods that are a good source of iron, such as fortified breakfast cereals, dark green vegetables, bread, beans and lentils, eggs, dried fruits (eg. apricots, figs and prunes), then they are likely to be getting enough iron to meet their needs. But if you are still concerned about your baby's iron intake, talk to your doctor and if they think a supplement is necessary then they can advise you on which one to give.

For most babies, milk and other dairy products will provide all the calcium a baby needs, but if your baby has a milk intolerance then it’s worth checking with your doctor if they are likely to be getting enough calcium and if a supplement is necessary.

I hope this helps. Until next time…
Helen

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Healthy eating for babies and toddlers

Posted on 30 June 2011 by Helen

Hi everyone,

The key to healthy eating for your babies and toddlers is variety! No one food can give them every nutrient they need, and a wide range of food tastes and textures experienced now will help ensure they have a healthier diet as they grow older. There are so many different foods readily available to us these days that, even if your baby has likes and dislikes, it should be possible to provide your baby with a varied, wholesome diet. Don’t worry if they go through phases of only wanting the same foods; this sometimes happens, but keep offering more different tastes along the way.

A healthy diet is one made up from a mixture of the 5 different food groups shown below:

Starchy foods - Every baby or toddler meal should be based on starchy foods such as rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, chapatti, cereals, yam or plantain (and offer starchy foods at some snack times).

Fruit and Veg - At every one of the mealtimes include some sort of fruit and/or vegetables. Aim for 5 portions per day and choose as many different colours of fruit and veg as possible.

Protein - Once weaning is established, aim to give two to three servings of ‘protein' foods such as meat, fish, eggs, beans or pulses, each day.

Dairy - Give them about three servings a day of dairy products such as milk, yogurt or cheese. From 6 months up to around the age of one year, your baby should be drinking about 500ml milk (breast or formula) per day, but this should decrease to around 360ml for toddlers from 1 year onwards.  

Fats or sugar - Foods that are high in fat and/or sugar can be a valuable source of the extra energy that babies and toddlers need, but should only be given in limited quantities.

Of course, as weaning progresses and your baby reaches the end of their first year, the range of different foods they can eat should have increased. There is lots of helpful advice on feeding a balanced diet to your toddler, you might also like to visit the Little People Plates website.

Best wishes,
Helen

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Extreme food refusal

Posted on 22 June 2011 by Helen

Hi Everyone,

Food refusal and faddy eating is something that a lot of you will experience with your toddlers (see my last blog). By 18 months old most children will have entered a ‘neophobic phase’ during which they will be reluctant to try new foods, but the key to getting through this stage is to keep offering your child new foods. Even though these new tastes and textures may be rejected at first, provided you keep exposing your toddler to new foods, keep calm and make sure they see other people around them eating different foods, most toddlers will get through this neophobic phase unscathed.

But what about when food refusal is extreme? Some children find it very difficult to move through this phase and will only eat a small number of different foods and refuse anything new in their diet over a long period. This can be very worrying for parents, especially if your child’s growth is being affected. If you find yourself in this situation, the most important thing is to make sure your toddler is getting enough energy (calories) for adequate growth and weight gain. Don’t worry too much about making sure your child has a more varied diet; introducing new foods should never be carried out at the expense of growth. 

Once your toddler is gaining weight well, then you can start thinking more about introducing new foods. Tips to keep in mind -

  • Never force your toddler to eat disliked foods
  • Don’t withhold accepted foods to encourage them to eat disliked foods as this may lead to weight loss
  • Avoid putting ‘disliked’ foods on the same plate as ‘liked’ foods – they may refuse the whole lot
  • Avoid long gaps between meals – being hungry won’t make your toddler eat disliked foods

If you think you need the help of an expert in childhood feeding difficulties (e.g. a paediatrician, clinical psychologist, dietitian or speech/language therapist) with managing your toddler’s extreme food refusal and to make sure they’re getting enough vitamins and minerals, ask your G.P. or health visitor for a referral.

Until next time,
Helen

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